HO HO HO It’s a GLUTEN-FREE Holiday!

 Gluten- Free, Holiday/Entertaining  Comments Off on HO HO HO It’s a GLUTEN-FREE Holiday!
Dec 172014
 

 

HO HO HO It’s a Gluten-Free Holiday!

The holidays can be challenging for people living with a gluten-related disorder since food is such a major focus of the festivities. With some preparation, and a few good recipes, you can have your (gluten-free) cake and eat it too!

Most children with Autism benefit greatly from simple changes in their diet. Eliminating Gluten is one such change that can benefit them greatly.

My son Hunter, really loves his desserts!

My Pumpkin Bread is one of his favorites.
Since he was small, I have made this simple treat for him.

It doesn’t need to be frosted or covered in sprinkles or powdered sugar…NO SIR…he just loves mommy’s Pumpkin Bread.

Hunter is in his teens now and he loves to help in the kitchen.

Pumpkin Bread is one of his favorite things to make.

I truly love spending this time with him baking together. I have an additional holiday gluten-free dessert recipe that is great for the home cook, hoping to impress their families this holiday season.

 It’s pretty cool and it’s attached as well. Here we go!

Click here for HUNTER’S Favorite Pumpkin Bread

GF Pumpkin Bread

Gluten-free desserts don’t always turn out fabulous and the last thing you want is to make a gluten-free delight for a holiday celebration that doesn’t live up to your expectations. (Be sure to try a few out beforehand). While many people may be watching their dessert intake on an average day and may not even partake in dessert at a dinner party, birthday party etc., almost no one refuses dessert at the holidays – making the enjoyment of their dessert that much more important. My recipe for Vanilla Christmas Trees are sure to be a hit with your friends.

Click here for my Vanilla Christmas Trees

GF Trees

Merry Christmas!!

Ashley.V

Vanilla Christmas Tree Meringues

 Desserts, Gluten- Free, Holiday/Entertaining  Comments Off on Vanilla Christmas Tree Meringues
Dec 172014
 

Vanilla Christmas Tree Meringues
Author: 
 
Ingredients
  • 4 Egg Whites
  • ½ tsp of Cream of Tartar
  • 1 cup of plain white sugar
  • 1 tablespoon Butter Vanilla Emulsion flavoring
  • Christmas colored sprinkles
  • Golden tree topper sprinkles
  • Green food coloring.
  • Icing bag (or zip lock bag) and a star-shaped frosting tip. You can find these in the frosting section at your grocery store.
Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to 225 degrees F.
  2. Prepare a baking sheet, covered in foil, and sprayed lightly with non-stick spray.
  3. Using an electric mixer, whip the egg whites for a few minutes on high speed until they are frothy.
  4. Add the sugar into the frothy egg mixture in small amounts.
  5. Continue to mix on high for 1 minute.
  6. Add in the cream of tartar.
  7. Add butter vanilla emulsion and green food coloring until desired shade is reached.
  8. Continue to whip the mixture on high for 4-5 minutes until stiff peaks form (meaning that the meringue holds a form when the mixer is turned off).
  9. Using an icing bag with a star shaped frosting tip, press the meringue mixture down onto the foil and gently swirl in a circular motion (like making soft serve ice cream).
  10. Add Christmas colored sprinkles and a golden sprinkle on top.
  11. Bake for 45 minutes or just before they begin to turn brown along the edges.
  12. Let them cool completely (or eat them when they are a tiny bit warm!).
  13. Store in an air tight container. Makes about 24 small trees.
  14. HOW FUN, right? You don’t have to be a professional to make adorable sweet treats. Just some simple ingredients, some simple directions, and you’re good to go!
  15. Merry Christmas!

 

Dec 082014
 

It’s hard to believe my favorite holiday is only a few weeks away – Christmas. This week I managed to finish all of my Christmas shopping for friends and family along with planning some unforgettable recipes to share with all of them.
December is a month of various Multicultural holidays. There are some wonderful holiday customs carried out all over the world, but also many delicious desserts, I would love to share a few with you.

Christmas in France
In French Happy/Merry Christmas is ‘Joyeux Noël’. In France, Father Christmas / Santa Claus / St. Nicholas is called Père Noël (Father Christmas).
The main Christmas meal, called Réveillon, is eaten on Christmas Eve/early Christmas morning after people have returned from the midnight Church Service. Dishes might include roast turkey with chestnuts or roast goose, oysters, foie gras, lobster, venison and cheeses. For dessert, a chocolate sponge cake log called a bûche de Noël (Yule Log) is normally eaten.

a buche de noel

To try this beautiful recipe for  Buche de Noel click here 

Christmas in Sweden
In Sweden, presents might be brought by Santa called ‘Jultomten’ or by gnomes/elves called ‘Nissar’ or ‘Tomte’. They’re called Nisse’ in Norway.
Around Christmas time in Sweden, one of the biggest celebrations is St. Lucia’s Day (or St. Lucy’s Day) on December 13th. The celebration comes from stories that were told by Monks who first brought Christianity to Sweden. St Lucia was a young Christian girl who was martyred, killed for her faith, in 304AD. The most common story told about St Lucia is that she would secretly bring food to the persecuted Christians in Rome, who lived in hiding in the catacombs under the city. She would wear candles on her head so she had both her hands free to carry things. Lucy means ‘light’ so this is a very appropriate name.
A popular food eaten at St. Lucia’s day are ‘Lussekatts’, St Lucia’s day buns flavored with saffron and dotted with raisins which are eaten for breakfast.

a lussekatter 2

Click here for this delicious Lussekatter recipe

Christmas in Italy
On Christmas Eve, it’s common that no meat (and also sometimes all dairy) is eaten. Often a light seafood meal is eaten people go to the Midnight Mass service. The types of fish and how they are served vary between different regions in Italy.
For many Italian-American families a big Christmas Eve meal of different fish dishes is now a very popular tradition! It’s known as The Feast of the Seven Fishes (‘Esta dei Sette Pesci’ in Italian). The feast seems to have its root in southern Italy and was bought over to the USA by Italian immigrants in the 1800s. It now seems more popular in America than it is in Italy! When people return from Mass, if it’s cold, you might have a slice of Italian Christmas Cake called ‘Panettone’ which is like a dry fruity sponge cake and a cup of hot chocolate!

a panettone

Click here to try this Panettone recipe for yourself

Christmas in Greece
In Greek Happy/Merry Christmas is ‘Kala Christougenna’.
On Christmas Eve, children, especially boys, often go out singing ‘kalanda’ (carols) in the streets. They play drums and triangles as they sing. Sometimes they will also carry model boats decorated with nuts which are painted gold. Carrying a boat is a very old custom in the Greek Islands.
If the children sing well, they might be given money, nuts, sweets and dried figs to eat.
The main Christmas meal is often Lamb or pork, roasted in an oven or over an open spit. It’s often served with a spinach and cheese pie and various salads and vegetables. Other Christmas and new year foods include ‘Baklava’ (a sweet pastry made of filo pastry filled with chopped nuts and sweetened with syrup or honey), Kataifi (a pastry made from a special form of shredded filo dough and flavored with nuts and cinnamon), Theeples (a kind of fried pastry). Another popular Christmas dessert are melomakarono, egg or oblong shaped biscuit/cakes made from flour, olive oil, and honey and rolled in chopped walnuts.

Food Stylist:  Jamie Kimm

Click here to try this mouthwatering Greek Baklava treat

Christmas in Japan
In Japanese Happy/Merry Christmas is ‘Meri Kurisumasu’.
In Japan, Christmas is known as more of a time to spread happiness rather than a religious celebration. Christmas Eve is often celebrated more than Christmas Day. Christmas Eve is thought of as a romantic day, in which couples spend together and exchange presents. In many ways it resembles Valentine’s Day celebrations in the UK and the USA. Young couples like to go for walks to look at the Christmas lights and have a romantic meal in a restaurant – booking a table on Christmas Eve can be very difficult as it’s so popular!
Fried chicken is often eaten on Christmas day. It is the busiest time of year for restaurants such as KFC and people can place orders at their local fast food restaurant in advance!
The traditional Japanese Christmas food is Christmas cake, but it’s not a rich fruit cake, but is usually a sponge cake decorated with strawberries and whipped cream.

a strawberry sponge 2

Click here for a traditional sponge cake recipe

I hope you enjoyed this “sweet” trip around the world…Let the holiday baking begin!

Dec 082014
 

Strawberry Sponge Cake
 
Ingredients
  • 6 oz butter, soft
  • 6 oz white sugar
  • 3 large eggs
  • 6 oz self-rising flour
  • 1 lemon, zested
  • 1 cup whipping cream
  • 1 tsp vanilla bean paste, or vanilla extract
  • 1 tbsp icing sugar and extra for sifting
  • ¾ lb strawberries
  • 4 tbsp good quality strawberry or raspberry jam
Instructions
  1. Pre-heat the oven to 350°F.
  2. Butter and line two 8 or 9-inch cake tins with parchment paper.
  3. Using a standing mixer, beat the butter, sugar and lemon zest until it becomes pale and fluffy. Add the eggs one at a time, beating well.
  4. Then fold in the flour, one spoonful at a time, and blend until well combined.
  5. Divide the mixture evenly between the 2 cake tins and level off with a knife.
  6. Bake for 20 minutes until the sponge cakes are well risen, golden brown and firm to the touch. Run a rounded butter knife around the inside edge of the cake tin and carefully turn the cake out onto a cooling rack.
  7. Meanwhile, hull the strawberries and slice them in half.
  8. Whip the cream, icing sugar and vanilla until it becomes quite stiff.
  9. When the cakes are cool, spread the jam on one of the sponge cakes and spread half of the whipped cream on top.
  10. Place half of the strawberries on top of the cream.
  11. Place the other sponge cake on top and spread with the remaining whipped cream.
  12. Arrange the remaining strawberries in a spiral round the top of the cake.

 

Dec 082014
 

Baklava (a Greek dessert pastry)
Cuisine: Greek
 
Ingredients
  • For the Baklava:
  • 1 pound pistachios and/or walnuts, coarsely ground, plus more for garnish
  • ½ teaspoon ground cinnamon, or to taste
  • 1 cup ground zwieback crackers or breadcrumbs
  • 4 sticks unsalted butter, melted
  • 16 sheets phyllo dough (thawed, if frozen), cut in half
  • For the Syrup:
  • 3 cups sugar
  • 1 6 -to-8-ounce jar honey
  • 1 to 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
Instructions
  1. Position a rack in the lower third of the oven; preheat to 350 degrees F.
  2. Combine the nuts, cinnamon and ground crackers in a bowl.
  3. Brush a 9-by-13-inch baking dish with some of the butter.
  4. Layer 10 pieces of phyllo in the dish, brushing each piece with butter before adding the next (keep the remaining dough covered with a damp towel).
  5. Sprinkle a quarter of the nut mixture over the dough.
  6. Layer 4 pieces of phyllo on top, brushing each with butter before adding the next; sprinkle with another quarter of the nut mixture.
  7. Add 4 more phyllo pieces on top, brushing each with butter, then add another quarter of the nut mixture, 4 more pieces of phyllo with butter, and the remaining nuts.
  8. Layer the remaining 10 pieces of phyllo on top of the nuts, brushing each with butter; brush the top piece with extra butter.
  9. Cut into the baklava to make strips, about 1½ inches wide.
  10. Then make diagonal slices, about 1½ inches apart, to create a diamond pattern.
  11. Bake until golden, about 1 hour.
  12. Meanwhile, make the syrup: Bring the sugar, honey and 1½ cups water to a boil in a saucepan over medium heat and cook, 10 to 15 minutes.
  13. Add the lemon juice and boil 2 more minutes, then let cool slightly.
  14. Pour the syrup over the warm baklava; let soak, uncovered, at least 6 hours or overnight. Garnish with nuts.

 

Panettone (Italian Christmas Bread)

 Breads, Holiday/Entertaining, International  Comments Off on Panettone (Italian Christmas Bread)
Dec 082014
 

Panettone (Italian Christmas Bread)
Cuisine: Italian
 
Ingredients
  • Makes 2 Panettone
  • Ingredients
  • Sponge:
  • 1 satchel (2¼ teaspoons) (7 gm) active dry yeast
  • ⅓ cup (80 ml) warm water
  • ½ cup (70 gm) unbleached all purpose flour
  • First Dough:
  • 1 satchel (2¼ teaspoons) (7 gm) active dry yeast
  • 3 tablespoons (45 ml) warm water
  • 2 large eggs, at room temperature
  • 1¼ cup (175 gm) unbleached all-purpose (plain) flour
  • ¼ cup (55 gm) (2 oz) sugar
  • ½ cup (1 stick) (115 gm) unsalted butter, at room temp
  • Second Dough:
  • 2 large eggs
  • 3 large egg yolks
  • ⅔ cup (150 gm) (5-2/3 oz) sugar
  • 3 tablespoons (45 ml) honey
  • 1 tablespoon (15 ml) vanilla extract
  • 1 teaspoon (5 ml) lemon essence/extract
  • 1 teaspoon (5 ml) orange essence/extract
  • 1 teaspoon (5 ml) (6 gm) salt
  • 1 cup (2 sticks) (225 gm) unsalted butter, at room temp
  • 3 cups (420 gm) (15 oz) unbleached all-purpose (plain) flour; plus up to (2/3 cup) 100 gm for kneading
  • Filling and Final Dough:
  • 1½ cups (250 gm) (9 oz) golden raisins or golden sultanas
  • ½ cup (75 gm) (2-2/3 oz) candied citron
  • ½ cup (75 gm) (2-2/3 oz) candied orange peel
  • Grated zest of 1 orange
  • Grated zest of 1 lemon
  • 2 to 3 tablespoons (30-45 ml) (15-25 gm) unbleached all-purpose (plain) flour
Instructions
  1. For the Sponge: Mix the yeast and water in a small bowl and allow to stand until creamy; about 10 minutes or so.
  2. Mix in the flour. Cover with plastic wrap and allow to double in size for about 20 to 30 minutes.
  3. For the First Dough: In the bowl of a stand mixer, mix together the yeast and water and allow to stand until creamy, about 10 minutes or so.
  4. With the paddle attachment, mix in the sponge, eggs, flour, and sugar.
  5. Add in the butter and mix for 3 minutes until the dough is smooth and even.
  6. Cover with plastic wrap and allow double in size, about 1 – 1 ¼ hours.
  7. For the Second Dough: To the first dough, with the paddle attachment, mix in the eggs, egg yolks, sugar, honey, vanilla, essences/extracts, and salt until well combined.
  8. Mix in the butter until smooth.
  9. Add the flour and slowly incorporate.
  10. At this stage the dough will seem a little too soft, like cookie dough.
  11. Replace the paddle with the dough hook and knead for about 2 minutes.
  12. Turn out the dough and knead it on a well-floured surface until it sort of holds its shape.
  13. Don’t knead in too much flour but you may need as much as ⅔ cup (100 gm).
  14. Be careful the excess flour will affect the finished product
  15. For the First Rise: Oil a large bowl lightly, plop in your dough and cover with plastic wrap.
  16. Now we need to let it rise until it has tripled in size.
  17. There a few ways to go about this: Rise in a warm place for 2 – 4 hours OR find a cool spot (64°F -68°F) (18°C – 20°C) and rise overnight OR rise for 2 hours on your kitchen bench then slow the rise down and place in the refrigerator overnight.
  18. If you do this it will take some time to wake up the next morning (maybe another hour or two).
  19. For the Filling and Final Rise: Soak the raisin/sultanas in water 30 minutes before the end of the first rise.
  20. Drain and pat dry with paper towels.
  21. Now take your dough and cut it in half.
  22. Combine all your filling ingredients in a bowl and mix well.
  23. Press out one portion of dough into an oval shape.
  24. Sprinkle over one quarter of the filling and roll up the dough into a log.
  25. Press out again into an oval shape and sprinkle over another quarter of the filling.
  26. Roll into a log shape again.
  27. Repeat with the second portion of dough.
  28. Shape each into a ball and slip into your prepared pans, panettone papers or homemade panettone papers.
  29. Cut an X into the top of each panettone and allow to double in size.
  30. Rising time will vary according to method of first rise.
  31. If it has been in the refrigerator it could take 4 hours or more.
  32. If it has been rising on the kitchen bench in a warm place it should be doubled in about 2 hours.
  33. For Baking: When you think your dough has only about 30 minutes left to rise, preheat your oven to moderately hot 400°F/200°C/gas mark 6.
  34. Just before baking carefully (don’t deflate it!) cut the X into the dough again and place in a knob (about a tablespoon) of butter.
  35. Place your panettoni in the oven and bake for 10 minutes.
  36. Reduce the heat to moderate 350°F/180°C/gas mark 4 and bake for another 10 minutes.
  37. Reduce the heat again to moderate 325°F/160°C/gas mark 3 and bake for 30 minutes until the tops are well browned and a skewer inserted into the panettone comes out clean.
  38. Cooling your panettone is also important.
  39. If you have use papers (commercial or homemade) lie your panettoni on their side cushioned with rolled up towels.
  40. Turn gently as they cool. If you have used pans cool in the pans for 30 minutes then remove and cushion with towels.

 

Dec 082014
 

Lussekatter ( St. Lucia Buns)
Cuisine: Swedish
Cook time: 
Total time: 
 
Ingredients
  • Ingredients:
  • 8 tablespoons (1 stick) unsalted butter
  • 1-1/3 cups milk
  • 1 teaspoon saffron threads, chopped fine and soaked in a few drops of water
  • 1 tablespoon active dry yeast
  • ⅔ cup sugar
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 2 eggs, divided use
  • 4 cups unbleached flour + flour for kneading
  • Raisins for garnish
Instructions
  1. Melt butter in a small saucepan set over medium heat.
  2. Add milk and saffron and heat until just until warm.
  3. Pour into bowl of an electric stand mixer.
  4. Sprinkle yeast over milk and let it sit for 5 minutes.
  5. Add sugar, salt, 1 egg and 2 cups flour.
  6. Beat with paddle attachment until smooth and well combine, about 2 minutes on medium speed.
  7. Add final 2 cups of flour.
  8. Using dough hook, beat until mixture is smooth and begins to climb beater.
  9. Transfer dough to a lightly floured surface and knead until perfectly smooth.
  10. This dough has a wonderful velvety texture to it.
  11. Place in a greased bowl, turn once to coat all surfaces, and let rise, covered, in a warm place until doubled in bulk, about 1 hour.
  12. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.
  13. Preheat oven to 400 degrees F. Punch dough down, roll into a cylinder 36 inches long.
  14. Cut 18 2-inch pieces from cylinder.
  15. Roll each piece into a 10-inch rope.
  16. Form each piece into an S, spiraling ends to form a figure eight.
  17. Transfer pieces to to prepared baking sheet.
  18. Let rise, covered, until doubled in size, about 45 minutes.
  19. Brush buns with reserved egg.
  20. Tuck raisins into spirals at each end of figure eight.
  21. Bake for 15 minutes, or until golden brown. Yield: 18 buns.

 

The Holidays and Moms Noodles

 Cooking Lessons, Holiday/Entertaining, Side Dish  Comments Off on The Holidays and Moms Noodles
Dec 052014
 

Chances are you’re spending a lot of extra time in the kitchen during the holidays preparing for countless festive meals. I would like to share with you one of my very favorites. ( I am only making faces, because the dough is so sticky…hahaha)

cq-noodlepic2

Moms Homemade Noodles

cq-noodlepic

Click here for my mom’s awesome recipe 

My mom’s noodles have always been a favorite for generations. They can be enjoyed anytime the mood strikes! I am so thankful that I have it, and that my children and their children will have it years from now. They love being in the kitchen with me and I really enjoy the time spent with them.
My most favorite thing is, when I pull the recipe and I see her handwriting. It’s the best!
These recipes are not perfect, or written like one in a cookbook, and of course, she didn’t  include how many servings it makes….But they are the real recipes that were created with love by her.
Are they still relevant? Maybe the foods and techniques aren’t  (remember Jell-O Molds), but what they represented still matters to most of us. I am sure you have 1 or 2 (maybe dozens) of cookbooks or recipes handed down.
A friend of mine told me recently, as she searched for a recipe in an old cookbook her mom left her, that not only did her mom leave notes on the pages of the recipes she used, but she also used to stick coupons and supermarket sales pages in them to hold the recipe page. Not only is the handwritten notes special to her, but also the (now) vintage coupons for “cents” off of various items, and the old supermarket ads.
Memories like this are wonderful for sharing with your family and friends.

CQ-mom
So get inspired, make a mess in the kitchen, and share your favorite recipes, too. Happy holidays!

Love, Jean

( PS. I love you mom)

Christmas in Puerto Rico

 Beverages, Easy Recipes, Holiday/Entertaining  Comments Off on Christmas in Puerto Rico
Dec 042014
 

Puerto Rico is an archipelago that includes the main island of Puerto Rico and a number of smaller islands, the largest of which are Vieques, Culebra, and Mona. The main island of Puerto Rico is, by land area, the smallest of the Greater Antilles. With around 3.6 million people, it ranks third in population among that group of four islands, which include Cuba, Hispaniola and Jamaica. The capital and largest city is San Juan. Due to its location, Puerto Rico has a tropical climate and is subject to hot weather all-year-round.

a PR flag
Puerto Ricans are known for their unforgettable “parrandas or trullas navideñas”. A Parranda is when a small group of friends gathers together to “asaltar” or surprise another friend. It’s the Puerto Rican version of Christmas caroling.
The parranderos arrive at the destination and then very quietly gather by the front door. At a signal all start playing their instruments and singing. The parrandas usually begin after 10pm in order to surprise and wake the sleeping friend. The parranderos are invited in and refreshments, music and dance follow. Of course we don’t surprise unsuspecting victims. The parranderos are given plenty of “hints” beforehand by the homeowner that he is ready to receive a parranda.

a Parranda
The party goes on for an hour or two then everyone, including the owners of the house, leave to parrandear some more. The group grows as they offer their parranda at several houses during that night. At the last house probably around 3 or 4 in the morning the homeowner offers the traditional chicken soup or asopao de pollo. The party is over at dawn.
Part of the holiday festivities includes cooking a pig on a spit. Most Puerto Ricans will feel their Christmas was a little incomplete if they did not get to participate or enjoy an old fashioned lechón asao. Cooking the pig is a big event. The pig is purchased and prepared a couple of days ahead. On the “big day” the pig is mounted on a stick and put to cook as early at 4 in the morning. At least two people must be on “watch” with the pig to turn it and make sure all goes well. Friends and relatives begin arriving later in the morning (this is an all day party.) While the pig roasts there is lots of holiday music. Older women will be in the kitchen cooking side dishes that will accompany the lechón. Children will be playing tag and getting in trouble. Guests bring traditional holiday desserts.

Traditional Puerto Rican Christmas foods such as pasteles, lechón asado, arroz con dulce, tembleque, and coquito give Puerto Ricans a separate identity from the rest of the world. Before Puerto Rican traditions became influenced by American culture Christmas Day was a joyful day and some gifts were received at some houses, but it was not from San Nicolás. Santa couldn’t make it to the tropics in his hot wool suit with cap and reindeer. Our holiday gifts used to be from Los Reyes Magos.
Our Reyes celebration begins on the eve of Three Kings Day.

a Pig a PR food

On the evening of January 5th Puerto Rican children go outside with scissors and shoe boxes to cut grass for the camels to eat. The grass goes into shoe boxes and the boxes are placed under the beds of parents, grandparents, godparents, uncles, aunts, etc. Some- time during the night Los Reyes come and while their camels eat the grass Los Reyes fill the shoe boxes to overflowing with gifts, and sweets, and many wonderful things.
Coquito is an eggnog-like alcoholic beverage traditionally served in Puerto Rico. It is made with rum, egg yolk, coconut milk, sweet condensed milk, cinnamon, nutmeg, and cloves. The drink is commonly associated with the Christmas holidays, where it is traditionally served along with other holiday food.
Variations of the drink include flavored rum or spiced rum, coconut cream, lemon zest, ice cream, ginger, ground nut horchata, vanilla, chocolate and evaporated milk; these ingredients are not required but are used to make the taste sweeter. Sometimes Coquito is made with pitorro as its alcoholic base. Coquito is served in shot glasses or small cups and it is usually sprinkled with grated nutmeg or cinnamon.

a-coquito

Click here for the recipe
El Museo del Barrio in New York City hosts an annual Coquito Tasting Contest during the month of December.
El Museo del Barrio, often known simply as El Museo (the museum) is a museum located in the East Harlem neighborhood of Manhattan. El Museo specializes in Latin American and Caribbean art, with an emphasis on works from Puerto Rico and the Puerto Rican community in New York City.

a el museo del barrio

Christmas in Puerto Rico is a big deal, bigger than in most places and bigger than you might imagine, if you get the chance to visit Puerto Rico, you will enjoy one of the most festive Christmas seasons in the world. And work on your tan as well.

 Posted by at 6:54 pm

Oriental Coleslaw

 Salads and Dressings, Vegetables  Comments Off on Oriental Coleslaw
Dec 012014
 

Oriental Coleslaw
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 
Serves: 4
 
Ingredients
  • 1 medium cabbage or prepared coleslaw
  • 8 tbs Sesame seed
  • 8 tbs slivered Almonds, browned
  • 4tbs sugar
  • 1tsp pepper
  • 2 tsp salt
  • 6 tbs Rice vinegar
  • ½ C salad oil
  • 2 pkg Ramen noodles
  • 4-5 Green Onions
Instructions
  1. Mix all Ingredients together, refrigerate and enjoy cold!